Skip to main content

Table of Contents

  1. Welcome to the C-SAP mini-site!
  2. Introducing the theme of the mini-site - domestic violence
  3. What do you already know about domestic violence? Try this quiz to find out...
  4. Surprised by some of the answers to the quiz? Here's an opportunity to find out more about domestic violence...
  5. Now you know more about domestic violence, what about volunteering in this field while you're at university? Why not consider working on a domestic violence helpline...
  6. Want to know more about how you might volunteer in the field of domestic violence? Read Damian's account here...
  7. More on volunteering in the field of domestic violence while you're at university... Why not consider outreach work with young people?
  8. So what's it like volunteering in outreach work? Here's an interview with Kirsty, who volunteers for Safe and Sound; and a piece by Lesley, who worked with women and girls involved in prostitution...
  9. A link to a key way of finding volunteering opportunities near where you're located...
  10. Counselling: spotlighting a career route you might take after volunteering in the field of domestic violence and starting to study for postgraduate counselling qualifications...
  11. Real-life case studies of careers that might develop from volunteering in the field of domestic violence or related areas...
  12. Emily's experiences of working part-time while a Sociology student
  13. Doing outreach work with children - A discussion of work done at Nottinghamshire Domestic Violence Forum
  14. Being a Service Manager for Refuge and Children's Services - BA (Hons) Social and Cultural Studies graduate, Jennifer, talks about her career
  15. Joining the Police - An interview with Tracy, a Chief Inspector
  16. Being a Training Officer - Diane talks about her work at Safe and Sound, Derby
  17. Working for an Offender Learning and Skills Service Project - An interview with Katie, who has a BA (Hons) in Sociology and Criminology and is currently studying for an MA in Criminology
  18. From Nursing to Counselling, via the Prison Service - Daphne talks about her career
  19. Managing a Voluntary Sector Organisation - Yasmin talks about her role at Derby Women's Centre
  20. Called to the Bar - An interview with Georgina, a Barrister
  21. Working as a Journalist - An interview with James, a Deputy Editor of a national newspaper
  22. Teaching as a Career - An interview with Christina, who has a BA (Hons) Politics and a PGCE in English and Citizenship, and is now a Head-Teacher
  23. Getting Elected as a Local Councillor - An interview with Stephanie, who did Combined Honours in Sociology and English and has an MA in Gender Studies
  24. Getting Elected as an MP - An interview with Sally Keeble MP, who has a degree in Sociology
  25. A link to a key careers website...
  26. If the material in this mini-site has affected you, here are organisations that can offer help
  27. Conditions of use

Emily's experiences of working part-time while a Sociology student

Top tips from Emily: 'What I have learnt is that employers look for more than a degree these days and having some good experience within a job or volunteering role can only make you look better than others and I would especially encourage all students to become involved in what they can do for the local community.'

Emily worked for Victim Support part-time while she was studying for a BA (Hons) in Sociology.

Whilst studying at Nottingham Trent I began thinking about what career path interested me and at the freshers fair whilst was in year 2, the charity Victim Support were advertising a 10 hour a week job role. I applied and thankfully got the job where I have now been working for eighteen months and if possible I will continue to work after I graduate.

I am one of seven 'victim care officers' which involves us attempting to contact the majority of victims of crime in Nottinghamshire to assess whether they need any practical or emotional support. If they do so I arrange and monitor this service with the victim to ensure they are feeling better in the long run.

Our office is open 8am till 8pm so I cover the 6-8 shift Monday - Friday which fits in perfectly with my degree and I also earn good money which funds my student lifestyle! It has been a brilliant experience as I have made some good friends and professional contacts, been on serious crime training schemes which are incredibly interesting and learnt more about what I may want to do with my future.

However the biggest benefit would have to be that I feel at home within Nottingham now; I don't just feel like a student here with a home where my parents live. I have been able to build my life here and hopefully have been a positive resource to the community of Nottingham.

The only negative I could think of is that when something happens at work you are expected to be able to give up time to attend, for example a meeting with another agency about a victim. This requires great dedication and if the course had required more lecture/seminar contact I would have struggled. Luckily sociology is greatly a self-learning course, where our own reading and development is vital and thus I have learnt to manage and organise my time efficiently.

I am currently applying for other jobs in case it is not possible to stay with Victim Support and I am finding that all the experiences I have had from my job can be supported by the modules I chose during my degree; for example race and ethnicity is beneficial for workplace diversity.

I have not only worked and studied whilst at university, I have thoroughly enjoyed my time at Trent and being a student however what I have learnt is that employers look for more than a degree these days and having some good experience within a job or volunteering role can only make you look better than others and I would especially encourage all students to become involved in what they can do for the local community.





NTU Logo
C-SAP Logo
University of Northampton